Webletters Graphic.jpg
Webletters Graphic.jpg

Letters, Nov. 23

Thanks for canceling

I was so interested in reading the editorial on Monday, Nov. 19, “Crossing a red line.”

I wanted to point out that these type of cartoons, men dragging women by the hair or vice versa, have never been funny.

They were not funny before the Me-too movement. They are not funny now.

I am so heartened that we as a culture are now beginning to see the importance of not using humor to justify pain and power abuses. Thank you for taking decisive action and removing “Rubes” by Leigh Rubin from your paper. It is the only way things will change. We need to walk our talk.

Susan Bizeau

Talent

SOU falls short

On Saturday the Oregon Center for the Arts held an all-day open house and dedication of the new theater building and JPR studios.

JPR certainly needed a new home. The students needed more rehearsal space and construction space for sets and costumes. The theaters needed new sound systems.

But on Saturday I went on my mobility scooter to the theater to see Small Mouth Sounds and couldn’t get in because the new doors are not electrically controlled. I had to wait for two people to open the outer and inner doors so I could enter the new lobby. When my scooter is in the entrance area, there is not enough room for the person opening the outer door to get by and open the inner door to the lobby thereby the need for two people. There is a new women’s restroom with plenty of stalls and wheelchair accessible sinks, but the door is not electrically operated, so a person with limited strength or who uses a walker or a wheelchair cannot get in or out independently.

I understand that that ADA (Americans with Disability Act) says only that a person needs to get to the building independently. It does not say the person has to be able to get into the building. But doesn’t common sense tell you that entering the building is just as important as getting there?

I will continue to attend plays in the theater building and when I go on my mobility scooter, I will wait patiently until two people come who can open the doors.

Edith Montgomery

Ashland

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