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Like the life that preceded it, the afterlife has not been kind to Dou Yi, played by Jessica Ko, in the Oregon Shakespeare Festival's production of "Snow in Midsummer." OSF / Jenny Graham

What's on stage: Friday, Oct. 12

When a young woman is sentenced to death, she curses her city from beyond the grave with a catastrophic drought. Three years later, the residents of the parched, locust-plagued city are forced to face a past no one wants to remember. Playwright Frances Ya-Chu Cowhig’s update of a classic Chinese drama into a modern ghost story explores the legacy of trauma, the heart of injustice and the lengths to which we go for love in the Oregon Shakespeare Festival's production of "Snow in Winter," showing through Oct. 27, in the Angus Bowmer Theatre in Ashland.

Camelot Theatre: 101 Talent Ave., Talent. Tickets and information available at camelottheatre.org or 541-535-5250.

‘Spotlight on Fleetwood Mac’: Rock band Fleetwood Mac endures as one of the world’s most popular, co-founded in 1967 by drummer Mick Fleetwood and guitarist Peter Green. Camelot’s spotlight will showcase songs written and performed by a contemporary lineup of the group, including John McVie, Christine McVie, Lindsay Buckingham and Stevie Nicks, played by guitarist and pianist Robby Dacosta, bassist Steve Fein, drummer Tom Freeman, pianist Brianna Gowland and guitarist Taran McGuire. Look for such hits as “Landslide,” “Go Your Own Way,” “Dreams,” “Think of Me,” “Rhiannon” and “You Making Loving Fun.” Presila Quinby directs. Curtain is at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Oct. 12-13, and 2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 14. Tickets are $26 or $33.

Collaborative Theater Project: 555 Medford Center, Medford. Tickets and information are available at ctporegon.org, by calling 541-779-1055 or at the box office.

‘Summerland’: Ghosts, strange occurrences and mysterious twists and turns fill playwright Arlitia Jones’ study of the Spiritualist movement of the late 19th century. Susan Aversa-Orrego directs. Oregon Shakespeare Festival veteran Russell Lloyd plays spirit photographer William H. Mumler; Jeff Ripley is Chief Marshal Joseph Tooker, a lawman determined to bring Mumler to justice; and Jessica Mengel plays Mumler’s strange and mysterious wife. Curtain is at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Oct. 12-13, and Thursday through Saturday, Oct. 18-20, and 1:30 p.m. Sundays, Oct. 14, 21 and 28. The show’s final week will run Friday, Oct. 26, through Halloween, Oct. 31. Tickets are $25, $20 for seniors, $18 for students.

Radio Days: In the style of 1940s radio programs, Geoff Ridden, Pam Ward, Keith Fuller and Daniel Sessions Stephens head up a cast to voice and create sound effects for Stephens’ adaptation of “Sherlock Holmes and the Hound of the Baskervilles.” Shows are set for 7:30 p.m. Sundays and Mondays, Oct. 14-15 and Oct. 21-22. Tickets are $10 at the door.

‘Don’t Tell Jane’: This Jane Austen vampire spoof by actor and educator William Coyne is set for readings at 1:30 p.m. Saturdays, Oct. 27 and Nov. 3, and 7:30 p.m. Sundays, Oct. 28 and Nov. 4. Coyne’s fun-filled script begins with classic Austin characters, and moves into an eerie realm of the undead. Tickets are $5 at the door.

Oregon Cabaret Theatre: First and Hargadine streets, Ashland. Tickets and information are available at oregoncabaret.com or by calling 541-488-2902. Reservations are required for pre-show dinner and brunch. Appetizers, beverages and desserts are available without reservations. Student rush tickets are $10 and can be purchased 30 minutes before curtain. A 20 percent discount is available for groups of 10 or more.

‘Picasso at the Lapin Agile’: Albert Einstein and Pablo Picasso meet in 1904 in a Parisian cafe, just before the scientist transforms physics with his theory of relativity and the painter sets the art world on fire with cubism. Steve Martin toys with the genius of the two men and the intersection of art and science in his playfully self-referential story. Valerie Rachelle directs. Stephen Kline plays Einstein, and Stefan Espinosa plays Picasso. Curtain is at 8 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, Mondays, and select Wednesdays; and 1 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays, through Nov. 11. Tickets $36, with limited $22 bistro seating.

Oregon Shakespeare Festival: 15 S. Pioneer St., Ashland. Showtimes, ticket prices and information available at osfashland.org or at 800-219-8161.

‘Virgins to Villains: My Journey with Shakespeare’s Women’: Actor Robin Goodrin Nordli’s witty and revealing one-woman show explores her personal life through the prism of the lives of William Shakespeare’s female characters. The show is set for 7 p.m. Monday, Oct. 15, in the Thomas Theatre. Tickets are $65, $30 for youth and students. Proceeds will benefit OSF’s Rising, a fund to overcome festival losses due to wildfire smoke.

‘Romeo and Juliet’: Star-crossed lovers Juliet and Romeo take the stage with lush period detail in William Shakespeare’s tragic tale. Dámasao Rodgríguez of Artists Repertory Theatre in Portland directs this story of a love for the ages — until fate and hatred turn the world against it. The show runs through Oct. 12 in the outdoor Allen Elizabethan Theatre. Curtain is at 8 p.m.

‘The Book of Will’: When close friends and fellow actors realize that the lines of the dead William Shakespeare are disappearing into time, they plan a definitive book of his original plays. To make one, they’ll have to battle an unscrupulous publisher, a boozy poet laureate and their own mortality in playwright Lauren Gunderson’s funny love letter to theater and the printed word. Christopher Liam Moore directs. The show runs through Oct. 13 in the outdoor Allen Elizabethan Theatre. Curtain is at 8 p.m.

‘Love’s Labor’s Lost’: The Princess of France and her ladies have chosen an awkward time to visit Navarre in William Shakespeare’s linguistically nimble, music-filled comedy. King Ferdinand and his friends have dedicated themselves to three years of study, contemplation and chastity. Undeterred, the ladies camp outside the gates, and it isn’t long before nature takes its course. Amanda Dehnert directs. The show runs through Oct. 14 in the outdoor Allen Elizabethan Theatre. Curtain is at 8 p.m.

‘Snow in Midsummer’: When a young woman is sentenced to death, she curses her city from beyond the grave with a catastrophic drought. Three years later, the residents of the parched, locust-plagued city are forced to face a past no one wants to remember. Playwright Frances Ya-Chu Cowhig’s update of a classic Chinese drama into a modern ghost story explores the legacy of trauma, the heart of injustice and the lengths to which we go for love. Justin Audibert directs. The show runs through Oct. 27 in the Angus Bowmer Theatre.

‘Henry V’: Actor Daniel Jose Molina completes his immersive three-play transformation from reckless party-boy Prince Hal to the shrewd and ruthless young leader King Henry V. The new king audaciously lays claim to the French throne, courts a princess with whom he does not share a language and takes his place on history’s stage in a series of battles still commemorated in England today. Rosa Joshi of Seattle makes her directorial debut at OSF. The show runs through Oct. 27 in the Thomas Theatre.

‘Manahatta’: Securities trader Jane Snake is torn between worlds. Her return to Wall Street brings her to Manahatta (“Island of Many Hills” in Lenape), the homeland of her Native American ancestors who were violently forced to evacuate in the 1600s. Meanwhile, her family in Oklahoma struggles to save their language, their culture and their over-mortgaged home. OSF presents the premiere of Mary Kathryn Nagle’s look at the tragic consequences of commercial exploits. Playwright Nagle also is a partner at Pipestem Law, a firm specializing in sovereignty of Native tribes and people, and a citizen of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma. Laurie Woolery directs. The show runs through Oct. 27 in the Thomas Theatre.

‘Oklahoma!’: It’s a beautiful morning whenever Curly sees Laurey, but Laurey’s not so sure about Curly. And Will loves Ado Andy, but Andy loves ... well, everyone. Meanwhile, in the 1906 Oklahoma Territory, farmers and ranchers lock horns in a battle over water rights and fences. This musical — with music by Richard Rodgers and book and lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein — brims with show-stopping songs and heartfelt storytelling. Director Bill Rauch breaks new ground with same-sex lead couples and other LGBTQ+ casting that affirms the identity spectrum in an insightful celebration of love in its many forms. The show runs through Oct. 27 in the Angus Bowmer Theatre.

‘The Way the Mountain Moved’: When four men set out in the 1850s to survey a route for a new continental railroad, they cross paths with lost pioneers, cautious Native Americans, and an African-American Mormon couple unsure whether to befriend, fight or flee the newcomers. Whose dreams will prevail? This play by Idris Goodwin joins other OSF American Revolutions commissions that explore key moments of change in U.S. history. May Adrales directs. The show runs through Oct. 28 in the Thomas Theatre.

‘Othello’: Those who praised Moorish general Othello’s military successes now reject his marriage to Venetian Desdemona. The newlyweds are determined to overcome all obstacles, but Othello’s assignment to a new location draws them into the demonic web of his lieutenant Iago in Shakespeare’s most intimate tragedy. Bill Rauch directs. The show runs through Oct. 28 in the Angus Bowmer Theatre.

‘Sense and Sensibility’: When Mrs. Dashwood and her daughters are tossed out of their home by a selfish half-brother, marriage prospects become bleak, and when love — or what looks like love — comes calling for the girls, they are whirled into a tangle of gossip, scandal and unexpected fortune. Kate Hamill’s adaptation of the novel by Jane Austen is directed by Hana S. Sharif. The show runs through Oct. 28 in the Angus Bowmer Theatre.

Randall Theatre: 20 S. Fir St., Medford. Tickets and information are available at randalltheatre.com or by calling 541-632-3258. Pay-what-you-want tickets are available 30 minutes before shows, subject to availability.

‘Evil Dead’: This laugh-out-loud musical follows five college students who accidentally unleash an evil force that turns them into demented spirits. Set to a high-octane score of rock ‘n’ roll. Book and lyrics by George Reinblatt, music by Frank Cipolla, Christopher Bond, Melissa Morris and Reinblatt. Rated R for language, adult situations and gore, no one under 17 will be admitted without accompanying adults. The first two rows of seats in the theater’s sections will be designated “splatter zones” for fake blood. Shows are set for 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Oct. 19-20, Thursday through Saturday, Oct. 25-27, Tuesday and Wednesday, Oct. 30-31, Friday and Saturday, Nov. 2-3, and 2 p.m. Sundays, Oct. 21 and 28. Tickets are $20. Combo packages include a reserved ticket for “Evil Dead” and a general admission ticket for Randall’s Nightmare Chamber haunted house.

Nightmare Chamber Haunted House: This year’s theme for Randall’s horror haunt is “The Evil Dead,” after the 1981 film by director Sam Raimi. Sequels to the film, “Evil Dead 2” and “Army of Darkness,” released in 1987 and 1992. Visitors familiar with the series will recognize iconic scenes, designed by Randall Executive Director Robin Downward. The haunt opens at 7 p.m. Thursday through Sunday, Oct. 18-21, Friday through Wednesday, Oct. 26-31, and Friday and Saturday, Nov. 2-3. Tickets are $12. Tickets discounted $2 can be purchased at all Magic Man Fun Shops in Medford and Grants Pass. Fast passes are $15 and allow visitors to skip wait time. Regular tickets can be upgraded to Fast Passes for $5 at the door. Combo packages, including a reserved ticket for “Evil Dead” and a general admission ticket for Randall’s Nightmare Chamber haunted house, are available.

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